Mosley’s Memory

Remembrance of things past ...with imagination.

November 3rd, 2011 · No Comments

Walter Mosely’s meditation on his first memories in The New York Times is a detailed account of awakening consciousness. Mosely, at the age of three — the year most likely is 1955  –  opens his eyes in front of the television in his parents’ home. He is suddenly flooded with images and…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: Book Reviews

Kerouac, Ginsberg, Lenny Bruce and Me

Helen Weaver's Beat memoir brings Greenwich Village of the 1950s to life.

August 12th, 2010 · No Comments

“I am the man who has best charted his inmost self.” Antonin Artaud quoted by Helen Weaver

Helen Weaver’s account of  her early days in Greenwich Village is misleadingly titled. Weaver, a new age author and translator nominated for a National Book Award in 1977 for her reading of Antonin Artaud,…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: Book Reviews

Holden Caulfield, Guru

Identity struggle makes J.D. Salinger's Catcher In the Rye timeless .

January 31st, 2010 · 1 Comment

UPDATED (at end): Since the death of J.D. Salinger, there’s been scads of comment declaring his books as life-changers (or not) and plenty of speculation on what waits in his safe to be published or what might be made into a movie and even some of that personal, David Copperfield kind…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: The Rabbit Rants

Mad Man

The founder of Mad created an American school of social satire.

January 3rd, 2010 · No Comments

There’s much to quibble over in Abram’s big, beautiful The Art of Harvey Kurtzman (the “man” in Kurtzman isn’t spelled out but drawn as  simplistic balloon-stick figure). Why include the complete “Superduperman” from Mad no. 4 (1953) instead of  samples from “Dragged Net!,” the parody of television’s cigarette-selling, L.A Cop promoting…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: Comics · The Rabbit Rants

Hefner’s True Love

The Playboy Founder's Lifetime Affair With Jazz

October 24th, 2009 · No Comments

Hugh Hefner may have had dozens of girlfriends over his 83 years, but his life-long love is jazz. Hefner declared his undying devotion to swing and big band music when the Rabbit interviewed him in 2008 for an inside story, “Jazz Playboy Style.” With all the recent attention, good and…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: The Rabbit Rants

Jung and Foolish

Carl Jung's 1957 text The Undiscovered Self speaks to today's mad politics.

September 19th, 2009 · No Comments

What would Carl Jung say about the current state of political discourse in America? The Rabbit’s been rereading the founder of analytical psychology’s The Undiscovered Self in preparation for Liber Novus, a “new” book which records Jung’s middle age conflict or, in pop-psychology parlance, mid-life crisis. Undiscovered is one of Jung’s most…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: The Rabbit Rants · Uncategorized

Beat Goes On

Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs, as well as the poets, artists and women of the Beat movement go! go! go! in Harvey Pekar's latest comic history

June 10th, 2009 · 1 Comment

The Beats of America’s 1950s stood far apart from the duty-bound, God-and-country, organizational-man times. It didn’t take long for the commercial culture to assimilate them in a wave of berets and bongos. The poetry, novels and art of the true counter-culture known as Beat is an honest reflection of American spirit and independence, commercial culture be damned.

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: Comics · Interviews

Kill All Comics!

How 1950’s paranoia went MAD

June 10th, 2008 · No Comments

Before slasher films, rap music and internet porn, even before rock ‘n’ roll, self-righteous America found cause for juvenile delinquency in comic books. Columbia journalism professor and former Entertainment Weekly editor David Hajdu unearths the largely forgotten 1950s campaign against illustrated pulp and discovers larger issues of censorship and Puritanical scape-goating…

Continue reading

[Read more →]

Tags: Book Reviews